Is It Just Bad Parenting?

Posted on by Jimmy Cruz

ADHD is what we know as the ‘Attention Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder’. This is a mental disorder featured by an inability to focus, an inability to control feelings and a short term memory impairment amongst many things, and it has a negative effect on the everyday life, both in the social and educational sense, of the patients diagnosed with it. Since the last few years, the number of children that have diagnosed with this disorder has significantly increased, and with it, speculations with regards to the disorder itself has also increased.

As most people would know, ADHD is sometimes – maybe most of the time – dismissed as a simple case of bad parenting, or even as ‘kids behaving like kids’. This opinion is not something that the general population only holds – there are many prominent experts in the field of psychology that have upright questioned the existence of ADHD, and even published reports, investigations and the like over its veracity. In part due to these opinions of experts and professionals, parents are likely to dismiss the inability of their kids to focus or keep their emotions in check, and not consult a professional psychologist about it.

However, anxiety treatment in Singapore and even studies that have been published on ADHD show that it is indeed a real disorder, something that needs to be addressed. Parents who tend to have had their children diagnosed with the disease are more likely to understand the difference between a normal kid and one who has been diagnosed with ADHD – this understanding should be something all parents, regardless of whether their children have ADHD or not, and teachers and other professionals who work with children, should have.

The reason behind this is that children suffering from ADHD tend to lack social skills and generally tend to underperform in society. People who do not believe in ADHD tend to simply regard these children as unintelligent, or perhaps that they have not been properly disciplined. This attitude towards children tends to make these adults hold negative opinion of such children – parents tend to distance their own children from ADHD-suffering children, and teachers might not put enough effort to teach children who simply can’t focus. As a result of this misapprehension, then, children suffering from ADHD tend to be more and more left behind in society, and this can have severe negative effects later on in their life. They tend to be accident-prone, give in to abuse (smoking, alcohol, etc.), or even risk teen pregnancy.

Thus, it is imperative that adults, especially those who face children on a constant basis in their daily lives, come to understand and accept ADHD as a proper mental disorder, and realize the negative effects it has on children – it is not just ‘bad parenting’.